presentations

Photo Talk – Aldridge Photo Club

I’m giving a talk tomorrow, entitled “Adventures in UK Underwater Photography”, to Aldridge Photo Club. If anyone would like to come along, you’d be welcome.

Aldridge Community Centre, Middlemore Lane, Aldridge, WS9 8AN. 7.45 for 8pm start.

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dives, trips

Devon weekend

Oaten Pipe hydroids
Oaten Pipe hydroids
Sending up the shot
Sending up the shot
On the bottom
On the bottom
Waiting on the line
Waiting on the line

I greatly enjoyed a trip to Devon last weekend and, though the water was cold, the visibility was surprisingly good. I managed four dives- two reefs and a wreck (twice). The reef, East Rutts was a very pleasant place to spend an hour and this early in the season is covered in Oaten Pipe (Tubularia indivisa) hydroids. Those hydroids won’t be around for very much longer, as they are the food for nudibranchs (sea slugs). We saw many spiral swirls of eggs, but no slugs yet, but I would expect that by May the hydroids will be gone.

The wreck was called the Riversdale. It’s large and intact (except for the bow), with an impressive rudder and prop. It’s a while since I dived and took photos on wrecks at this depth (38m to the deck) and, photographically it was quite a challenge, due to the narcosis and the limited time. Even with good vis, lighting is difficult. We dived it twice, on consecutive days, as we could not get the shot line up after the first dive, so had to leave it in overnight and send it up on a lifting bag at the start of the second dive!

The vis was very good (about 8-10m), but I could see the beginnings of a “May bloom” of algae in the top few metres. Let’s hope that comes and goes quickly and does not spoil the view too much.

dives, musings

Stargazing

This hermit crab looks for all the world as if he's looking up at the stars!
This hermit crab looks for all the world as if he’s looking up at the stars!

 

On a recent trip to Scotland, we were dogged by poor visibility. This image of a hermit crab (Pagarus bernhardus) shows how much silt was suspended in the water. This site was actually one of the better ones (the shore of Loch Sunart, at a place called Camas Torsa) and I like the way the hermit crab seems to be looking up into a starry sky. I find hermit crabs endlessly entertaining and I have mused about them before, but it did make me smile. This particular individual had lovely iridescent hairs on it which have been picked up by the well-snooted strobe. I was shooting using the Nikon 60mm macro lens on my trusty D200. The critter was conveniently walking on an old crate in the water, which provided a fantastic stage from which I could take his portrait as he looked up and wondered if alien life existed out there…

publications

Photo Quest

The first three Photo Quest articles
The first three Photo Quest articles

Oriental Sweetlips

Inside the Eagan LaneI am very proud to have been offered a regular column in Scuba magazine. It is an interesting commission because each monthly article is written jointly with my long-time dive buddy and fellow underwater photographer Trevor Rees. Each month, we are showing a pair of images and using them to exemplify a particular photo subject or style. It’s just as well that Trevor and I get on well, because it has taken quite a lot of discussion to evolve our own style and I’m grateful for the advice and encouragement of Scuba editor, Simon Rogerson.

We started with some obvious topics – wrecks, fish, big animals – and we’re hoping to touch on the whole range of underwater photography, UK and overseas. We’re trying to focus on camera technique, rather than post-processing and also to keep to ideas and advice that divers can try, regardless of their camera kit. I’m looking forward to shooting some images to demonstrate our ideas and I hope that the series might inspire others to take photos underwater, especially in the UK.

equipment, techniques

Macro magnification

Having tried my lovely new Nikon 105mm macro lens out on a recent trip to Scotland, I had borrowed a Nikon diopter and also used a teleconverter. Now I had discovered that I was able to get some pleasing images, I was interested in making some measurements.

By using different combinations of these three items (lens, teleconverter and dioptre) different magnifications can be obtained, but as usual there are trade offs to be made. On one hand, a teleconverter increases magnification without needing to get closer (ie same working distance), but the optics absorb some light, which means either brighter illumination or a larger aperture, which in turn reduces the (already very narrow) depth of field. On the other, a dioptre lens increases magnification without absorbing so much light, but reduces the working distance.

So which is the best combination to choose? The first step, I felt was to try all the combinations and measure the magnification, working distance and depth of field. This would provide me with objective data to make decisions.

20140323-074655.jpg

It seems to boil down to working distance- the dioptre is likely to give better results if the subject is suitable- shorter working distance (so hopefully less backscatter) coupled with higher magnification. However, the teleconverter will help with more skittish subjects because it gives high magnification at a longer working distance, but relies on not having too much suspended matter in the water. Using both is a possibility, will require some care to ensure that the appropriate part of the image is in focus, due to the wafer thin depth of field.

publications

Cover of Scuba Magazine

Scuba Cover April 2013I’m really proud to be asked for an image to adorn the cover of Scuba magazine this month (Issue 17, April 2013). I was approached to provide an image specifically of the wreck of the James Eagan Layne, a liberty ship torpedoed by U-339 in 1945, which came to rest on the seabed in Whitesand Bay, just West of Plymouth.

This is a site I know really well and have many images of. I chose this image, which was taken in June 2005 at the bow, looking up with my underwater photography buddy, Trevor Rees acting as a model. It was shot using a Nikon D100 camera with Nikon 10.5mm fisheye lens and lit with dual Sea & Sea YS-90 strobes, at a depth of probably 15-20m.

James Eagan Layne

The shot shows the vertical profile of the bow, which is well encrusted with marine life, particularly dead mans fingers (Alcyonium digitatum). I was very pleased to get a pleasant green tone to the water; often when looking up towards the surface, unpleasant artefacts are produced as the camera struggles to cope with the dynamic range. I have avoided this by not facing towards the sun and because I am quite deep.

publications

BSoUP Underwater Photography Championship win!

This weekend saw the annual British Society of Underwater Photographers (BSoUP) “splash-in” championships. Its a weekend I always enjoy because Plymouth, where it’s held, provides very varied dive sites and, whatever equipment the participants use, we are shooting in the same conditions. See this wetpixel article for an account of the event.

This year, I chose to dive solo and shoot a self-portrait. I had arranged some extra arms on the housing, so I could prop it up and aim the camera where I wanted. I found a nice location on the bow of the Scylla, just feet from the shot line. The technquie involves setting up the interval timer on the D200, swimming round into position and then gurning at the camera.

I was pleased with the composition and exposure, but I think I still have some way to go as a model! However, I was very pleased to win the “Mankind in the Sea” category with this image.

Self-portrati on HMS Scylla, Plymouth, July 2012