presentations

Photo Talk – Aldridge Photo Club

I’m giving a talk tomorrow, entitled “Adventures in UK Underwater Photography”, to Aldridge Photo Club. If anyone would like to come along, you’d be welcome.

Aldridge Community Centre, Middlemore Lane, Aldridge, WS9 8AN. 7.45 for 8pm start.

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trips

Fireworks and flame shells

Underwater photographers tend to take a different view of dive sites on a trip to non-shooting divers. We will often be keen to keep returning to the same site repeatedly on a trip rather than trying to see a different site on each dive. So it was on a recent trip to West Scotland, I dived in only two sites. In each of two sea lochs, I dived in a single area. However these were very much contrasting locations, one a very clean high energy site needing slack water and the other a slightly murky low energy spot. Each is home to unusual but “locally common” species, well worth braving the 6-degree water temperature for.

Loch Duich is home to the impressive fireworks anemone and the maerl bed of the narrows at the head of Loch Carron is home to hidden flame shells, as well as a mass of macro subjects. Here are a selection of images to give a flavour of the sites.

First of all, Loch Duich:

And here’s North Strome on Loch Carron:

trips

What weekends are made for…

Finally I have been able to take advantage of the summer light and good visibility. I have been rewarded with an excellent dive on HMS Elk. This is a trawler that was pressed into service during WWII, but sank not far from the entrance of Plymouth sound. When I dived it last Saturday, the visibility was excellent; though I have dived this wreck a number of times, I don’t remember there being this much light. The wreck is relatively small, but resting on the seabed at around 35m, this makes it a good size to get a good look around without clocking up too much deco.The bow of HMS Elk

I’m very grateful to my buddy Darren Ashford for patiently modelling for me for about half of our bottom time. 

A shoal of bib on the boilers of HMS Elk

An impressive shoal of bib hanging over the boilers. I did not have enough bottom time left to do this scene justice. There’s always a reason to go back….

Hang time

The inevitable end to such a dive- waiting out the deco time on the line. In this case, well worth it.

dives

Salcombe Pea Soup

Sometimes called by divers “May bloom”, “snot” or terms less repeatable in polite circles,  there comes a time each spring in temperate waters when there is an explosion in the algae population. So it was in the Devon waters I dived with my club last weekend. Its not often a trip is a photographic washout, but my recent trip to Salcombe was almost so. Last time I went, early in April the water was clear (but very cold) and the visibility was excellent due to bright sun. That same sun, a few weeks later had caused the same stretch of sea (East Rutts) into murky pea soup, with countless green spheres in the water column from the surface to below 20m. Conditions were not helped by choppy seas and overcast skies. Still, a bad day’s diving is better than a good day in the office, as they say….

Red Fingers (Alcyonium glomeratum)
Red Fingers (Alcyonium glomeratum)
Hangin' out in the soup

dives, trips

Devon weekend

Oaten Pipe hydroids
Oaten Pipe hydroids
Sending up the shot
Sending up the shot
On the bottom
On the bottom
Waiting on the line
Waiting on the line

I greatly enjoyed a trip to Devon last weekend and, though the water was cold, the visibility was surprisingly good. I managed four dives- two reefs and a wreck (twice). The reef, East Rutts was a very pleasant place to spend an hour and this early in the season is covered in Oaten Pipe (Tubularia indivisa) hydroids. Those hydroids won’t be around for very much longer, as they are the food for nudibranchs (sea slugs). We saw many spiral swirls of eggs, but no slugs yet, but I would expect that by May the hydroids will be gone.

The wreck was called the Riversdale. It’s large and intact (except for the bow), with an impressive rudder and prop. It’s a while since I dived and took photos on wrecks at this depth (38m to the deck) and, photographically it was quite a challenge, due to the narcosis and the limited time. Even with good vis, lighting is difficult. We dived it twice, on consecutive days, as we could not get the shot line up after the first dive, so had to leave it in overnight and send it up on a lifting bag at the start of the second dive!

The vis was very good (about 8-10m), but I could see the beginnings of a “May bloom” of algae in the top few metres. Let’s hope that comes and goes quickly and does not spoil the view too much.

publications

Photo Quest

The first three Photo Quest articles
The first three Photo Quest articles

Oriental Sweetlips

Inside the Eagan LaneI am very proud to have been offered a regular column in Scuba magazine. It is an interesting commission because each monthly article is written jointly with my long-time dive buddy and fellow underwater photographer Trevor Rees. Each month, we are showing a pair of images and using them to exemplify a particular photo subject or style. It’s just as well that Trevor and I get on well, because it has taken quite a lot of discussion to evolve our own style and I’m grateful for the advice and encouragement of Scuba editor, Simon Rogerson.

We started with some obvious topics – wrecks, fish, big animals – and we’re hoping to touch on the whole range of underwater photography, UK and overseas. We’re trying to focus on camera technique, rather than post-processing and also to keep to ideas and advice that divers can try, regardless of their camera kit. I’m looking forward to shooting some images to demonstrate our ideas and I hope that the series might inspire others to take photos underwater, especially in the UK.

publications

Explore the Shore

I am really proud to have a feature on shore diving (“Explore the Shore”) in the June 2012 edition of Scuba Magazine. This is a subject close to my heart. I love the flexibility to decide where, when and how long to dive for. There is a special excitement to exploring a remote stretch of shore, perhaps previously un-dived.

This type of relaxed diving tends to produce my best photographic work too. Shore diving also fits in very well with camper vanning; my ‘van lets my buddy and I access diving locations which would be pretty difficult to explore otherwise. Here’s to my next expedition…..

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