equipment

Reassuring light

The worst nightmare for any underwater photographer is a flood. You know what they say: there are two types of underwater photographer- those that have flooded a housing, and those who haven’t…yet. Every time I get in the water with my camera, I always wonder if water will get into the housing. I think most underwater shooters have a ritual to follow when setting up the camera to avoid a leak, and I for one never used to deviate from mine. After all, some of the steps in my setting up process might be unnecessary, but my fear of a flood prevents me from changing the ritual.

Well, for a year now I have been using a leak detector, which lets me pressure test my housing before every dive, and it has made a massive difference to my confidence in how I have set up the housing (as well as allowing me to streamline my setting up ritual).

DSC_7365I use a device called Leak Sentinel, purchased from the very helpful Miso Milivojevic, who designed and manufactures them in Slovenia under the company name of Vivid Housings. The device fits into a spare strobe port on my housing; some of the air is evacuated from the housing with a small pump. If this under-pressure remains stable, then the housing has no leak and is safe to dive. The leak sentinel indicates this with a reassuring green flashing light.

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I have just upgraded mine with a new circuit board which adds some new features. The Leak Sentinel can now compensate for temperature changes (which are likely to affect the pressure and potentially cause a false positive); it now allows me to test the housing a day or so before the trip, and also warns me when the leak sensor battery is getting low.The device has already paid for itself because it detected a leak in the system, which I spotted and corrected, rather than finding out when I got in the water….

trips

What weekends are made for…

Finally I have been able to take advantage of the summer light and good visibility. I have been rewarded with an excellent dive on HMS Elk. This is a trawler that was pressed into service during WWII, but sank not far from the entrance of Plymouth sound. When I dived it last Saturday, the visibility was excellent; though I have dived this wreck a number of times, I don’t remember there being this much light. The wreck is relatively small, but resting on the seabed at around 35m, this makes it a good size to get a good look around without clocking up too much deco.The bow of HMS Elk

I’m very grateful to my buddy Darren Ashford for patiently modelling for me for about half of our bottom time. 

A shoal of bib on the boilers of HMS Elk

An impressive shoal of bib hanging over the boilers. I did not have enough bottom time left to do this scene justice. There’s always a reason to go back….

Hang time

The inevitable end to such a dive- waiting out the deco time on the line. In this case, well worth it.